Parasite Pressures on Feral Honey Bees. Feral Colonies Are Pathogen Reservoirs. A PlosOne Publication.

Catherine E. Thompson, Jacobus C. Biesmeijer, Theodore R. Allnutt, Stéphane Pietravalle, Giles E. Budge

Feral honey bee populations have been reported to be in decline due to the spread of Varroa destructor, an ectoparasitic mite that when left uncontrolled leads to virus build-up and colony death. While pests and diseases are known causes of large-scale managed honey bee colony losses, no studies to date have considered the wider pathogen burden in feral colonies, primarily due to the difficulty in locating and sampling colonies, which often nest in inaccessible locations such as church spires and tree tops. In addition, little is known about the provenance of feral colonies and whether they represent a reservoir of Varroa tolerant material that could be used in apiculture. Samples of forager bees were collected from paired feral and managed honey bee colonies and screened for the presence of ten honey bee pathogens and pests using qPCR. Prevalence and quantity was similar between the two groups for the majority of pathogens, however feral honey bees contained a significantly higher level of deformed wing virus than managed honey bee colonies. An assessment of the honey bee race was completed for each colony using three measures of wing venation. There were no apparent differences in wing morphometry between feral and managed colonies, suggesting feral colonies could simply be escapees from the managed population. Interestingly, managed honey bee colonies not treated for Varroa showed similar, potentially lethal levels of deformed wing virus to that of feral colonies. The potential for such findings to explain the large fall in the feral population and the wider context of the importance of feral colonies as potential pathogen reservoirs is discussed.


This message brought to you by Bee Culture, The Magazine Of American Beekeeping, published by the A.I. Root Company. Find us at –Twitter. Facebook. Bee Culture’s Blog.

Free practical insights, helpful information, and fun from Award Winning Kelley Bees’s monthly newsletter.

Need more bees? Need better bees? Feed Global Patties for better bee health, production, wintering and survival. Hungry hives will often eat a patty a week — even when pollen is available in the field. Try Global Patties and see the difference. Learn More.

Small Hive Beetle traps and control products, World’s largest selection, all chemical free.www.beetlejail.com

Quality Top Bar Hives by Gold Star Honeybees – good for you, good for your bees, good for the planet. Check us out at www.goldstarhoneybees.com